Currently Owner/Director of Optimization @okay_marketing

Close Notification

All posts in: Windows XP

Completely removing Windows XP Printer Driver

If you right click on a printer and delete it, this doesn’t remove the printer driver from the machine. Sometimes when working with print servers and testing multiple drivers there will be times when you need to completely remove a driver package from the machine so you can install a new or different one.

Step #1

Reboot the machine and login as “Administrator”.

Step #2

Go to the control panel, go up to the file menu and select “Server Properties”.

XP Server Properties

XP Server Properties

Step #3

Select the “Drivers” tab and then you will now have a list of printer drivers currently installed on the machine. You can select “Remove” to completely uninstall and delete the driver package.

XP Delete Printer Driver

XP Delete Printer Driver

Step #4

Reboot the machine and the driver is gone. You can now test new or different drivers if needed.

sysprep-windows-xp-sp3

How to Sysprep XP Machine SP3 / Copy Administrator Profile to Default Profile

I realize this article is a little old since Windows 7 is coming out here in a few days, but I thought I would share it with you in case your business has decided to stick with XP for now. When you sysprep a machine you are basically wanting to clone the settings from that machine to another one. You also want it to copy those changes to each profile, correct? Well, in order for the sysprep to successfully copy over the administrator profile to the default profile for each user you have to add an extra line to the sysprep.inf file or else it won’t work in Service Pack 3 like it did in Service Pack 2.

Step #1

The first step is to download the Sysprep App which is included in the CAB file for Windows XP Service Pack 3 Deployment Tools. (Download Sysprep Tool)

Step #2

Next go to the PC you are going to be sysprepping and create a folder on the root of the C: drive called sysprep.

Step #3

Next you will need to extract the contents of the deploy.cab file you downloaded in Step #1 to the sysprep folder on the root of the C: drive.

Step #4

Now we are going to run the sysprep Setup Manager. Double click on setupmgr.exe.

Sysprep Setup Manager

Sysprep Setup Manager

Step #5

Click Next and it is going to ask you whether you want to modify an existing Answer File or create a new one. We are wanting to create a new one, so again click next.

Sysprep - New or Existing Answer File

Sysprep - New or Existing Answer File

Step #6

You now have three options: Unattended Setup, Sysprep Setup, or Remote Installation Services (RIS). In this example we are going to select the Sysprep setup option and then click next. (This creates a sysprep.inf file)

Sysprep - Sysprep.inf File

Sysprep - Sysprep.inf File

Step #7

Select Windows XP Professional and click next. (This will also work on Windows XP Home, Windows Server 2003 Standard, Web, and Enterprise.)

Sysprep - Windows XP Professional

Sysprep - Windows XP Professional

Step #8

In this step it is asking you if you want to fully automate the installation. That is up to you, either way works fine. In this example I will be using the “No, do not fully automate the installation.”

Sysprep - Fully Automate or Not?

Sysprep - Fully Automate or Not?

Step #9

Now we are at the configuration page. There is a lot in here so I am not going to go into detail. In fact, you don’t even need to input anything here for the sysprep to just work. However, everything you input in here will save you time and help shape your image.

Sysprep - Configuration Page

Sysprep - Configuration Page

Step #10

Once you are all done, you should be at the bottom and selected on “Identification String”; click Finish and it is going to prompt you for a location to create and save the sysprep.inf file. The default location is fine, as it will need to be within that sysprep folder on your C: drive. Once you hit ok you will then need to click “Cancel”. There is no close button.

Sysprep - Saving the Sysprep.inf File

Sysprep - Saving the Sysprep.inf File

Step #11

Now you should verify the sysprep.inf file by double clicking on it and opening it up with Notepad.

Sysprep - Verifying the Sysprep.inf File

Sysprep - Verifying the Sysprep.inf File

Step #12

There were a few changes with Windows XP Service Pack 3 and sysprep. The administrator’s profile is no longer copied over to the default profile. You will need to add a line within the sysprep.inf file to regain this important function. Under the InstallFilesPath section add this:

UpdateServerProfileDirectory=1

Once done, hit save.

Sysprep - Adding line to sysprep.inf so the administrator profile will copy over to default profile

Sysprep - Adding line to sysprep.inf so the administrator profile will copy over to default profile

Step #13

Now you are ready to start the sysprep, reboot, and capture your sysprepped image. Double click on the sysprep.exe and then select the following three options in order: Use Mini-Setup, Shutdown Mode: Reboot, and click Reseal. Make sure you have your media ready to capture your image. If you reboot fully without booting to your capturing software it will ruin the sysprep and you will have to redo the sysprep.

Sysprep - Preparation Tool 2.0

Sysprep - Preparation Tool 2.0

scangear

How to Install and Configure Canon ScanGear Tool

This is a short guide to setting up the Canon ScanGear Tool to enable the Canon copiers to be able to scan directly from the copy machine to the computer.

Step #1

First you will need to download the ScanGear Tool from Canon’s website. Version 2.21 will work with all the non-color copiers like Canon IR-2200. Version 2.71 will work with all the newer Canon color copiers.

Download Canon ScanGear Tool V.2.21
Download Canon ScanGear Tool V.2.71

Step #2

Run the EXE you just downloaded. By default the EXE unpacks the contents of the EXE to your TEMP folder.

  • TEMP FOLDER LOCATION on Windows 2000 through XP
  • C:\\Documents and Settings\\NameofUser\\Local Settings\\Temp
  • TEMP FOLDER LOCATION on Vista through Windows 7
  • C:\\Users\\NameofUser\\AppData\\Local\\Temp

    Step #3

    Launch the setup file located within the TEMP folder and go through the prompts to install the ScanGear Tool.

    Step #4

    Once installed, you will need to launch the ScanGear Tool and input the IP address of the copier. Make sure it connects successfully by click the “Test Connection” button.

    Canon ScanGear Tool

    Canon ScanGear Tool

    Step #5

    Now you can Scan with the copier. For this example, I am going to be using the “Microsoft Office Document Scanning” tool provided within Microsoft Office 2003 through 2010.

  • LOCATION OF MODS in XP, Vista, & Windows 7: Start Menu -> Microsoft Office -> Microsoft Office Tools
  • Step #6

    Now walk over to your Canon copier. Press the big SCAN button to switch the copier into SCAN mode.

    Step #7

    Select the “Online” option to force the SCAN mode on. (It will start searching for the ScanGear client on your computer)

    Step #8

    Place the document you are wanting to scan into the feeder tray on top of the Canon Copier. (It will not start scanning until feeder tray has paper in it)

    Step #9

    On your computer, select Scan (black and white or color) and then the computer will begin scanning your documents.
    Microsoft Office Document Scanning Tool

    mkvtoolnix

    Combine or convert two .MKV files into one .MKV file

    There is a great piece of freeware called MKVToolNix which lets you merge and convert MKV files. Do you have two or more .MKV files you want to merge? This is perfect for that. Do you have a .AVI file you want to convert to a .MKV file? This is also perfect for that. As the world of entertainment moves into HD and x264 this little application will be very handy. It works under all major windows operating systems, Windows XP x32, Windows Vista x32, Windows Vista x64, Windows 7 x32, and Windows 7 x64.

    MKVToolNix
    dism

    Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) – WinPE 3.0 Boot Environment

    I recently compiled a new library of commands since the upgrade from WinPE 2.0 to WinPE 3.0. With Windows 7 coming along they released a new way to create bootable USB sticks using Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM.exe). You might be asking yourself, what could I use this for? We are using it at my work to re-image computers, capture backup images, mount images, etc. There are many other uses for it but I will not get into that here. I have literally done this procedure a couple hundred times. In a future article I will show you how to write a simple batch script to automate this process. But it helps to understand what is going on with each command in case you have trouble. Batch scripts never work 100% of the time.

    * Article Updated on 08.15.2012

    You will need the following to proceed:

  • Windows® Automated Installation Kit (AIK) for Windows® 7 RC (Download from Microsoft) : 08.06.09
  • Bootable Flash drive (500MB or larger)
  • Once you have installed WAIK then you will need to browse to your start menu and click on “Deployment Tools Command Prompt”. I have provided a picture below.

    DISM

    Once you have launched DTCP you will need to follow through the commands I have compiled below. The first one I have provided a screenshot.

    DISM – Step #1 – Prep/Cleanup

    DISM /Cleanup-Wim

    The DISM cleanup command simply cleans up any previous wims/mounts you have been working with. If you do this a lot, you will need to use this command otherwise you will start receiving errors from previous wims possibly still left on the system.

    DISM Step #1

    DISM – Step #2 – Copy WinPE 3.0 to your local C Drive

    copype.cmd x86 c:\\winpe_x86
    copy c:\\winpe_x86\\winpe.wim c:\\winpe_x86\\ISO\\sources\\boot.wim
    

    This creates a winpe_x86 folder on your C: drive and then copies the contents of the WinPE folder from the WAIK installation to your folder.

    DISM – Step #3 – Mounting .Wim File on your local C Drive

    Dism /Mount-Wim /WimFile:C:\\winpe_x86\\winpe.wim /index:1 /MountDir:C:\\winpe_x86\\mount 

    This command mounts the wim file that was copied over in step #2 so that you can browse the system32 folder and insert your custom scripts, etc.

    DISM – Step #4 – Adding Packages to your WIM

    Dism /image:C:\\winpe_x86\\mount /Add-Package /PackagePath:"C:\\Program Files\\Windows AIK\\Tools\\PETools\\x86\\WinPE_FPs\\winpe-wmi.cab"
    Dism /image:C:\\winpe_x86\\mount /Add-Package /PackagePath:"C:\\Program Files\\Windows AIK\\Tools\\PETools\\x86\\WinPE_FPs\\en-us\\winpe-wmi_en-us.cab"

    There are many packages you can add to your WINPE boot environment, these are two I always add to mine.

    DISM – Step #5 – Adding Drivers to WinPE

    DISM /image:c:\winpe_x86\mount /Add-Driver /driver:C:\YOUR_FOLDER_OF_INF_DRIVERS\ /recurse

    A nice addition to DISM over the previous peimg command in WINPE 2.0 is the ability to add drivers with the /recurse command. The /recurse command now allows us to simply have all of our drivers in their own directory and tell DISM to scan the root folder and everything beneath it. The number of sub directories won’t matter. I have a huge library of drivers, for example, you will want to have the network and vga drivers for anything that you boot up to in the WinPE environment. By adding the network driver to your WinPE boot environment, it allows you to access network shares for capturing and deploying .wim images.

    DISM – Step #6 – Adding Custom Scripts, Batch Files, Etc.

    xcopy /e /y "C:\\YOUR_FOLDER_OF_SCRIPTS" C:\\winpe_x86\\mount\\Windows\\System32\\

    Without adding anything to your WinPE boot environment you will simply be left with a command prompt window when booting to it on a computer. I have added over 15 different batch scripts with different functions. Click here to download my WinPE discs. One thing I highly suggest adding is GImageX. GImageX is a very small GUI program that you can add to be able to capture, deploy, and mount images within the WinPE boot environment. I have provided a picture of GImageX GUI below.

    For WinPE 3.0 Boot Environment - Mount, Deploy, Capture Images

    DISM – Step #7 – Unmounting your finished .WIM

    Dism /Unmount-Wim /MountDir:C:\\winpe_x86\\mount\\ /Commit

    This commits the final changes to your .WIM file and anything you added to it. It is very important to unmount your .WIM file when you have finished.

    DISM – Step #8 – Copies your .WIM to Boot ISO

    copy c:\\winpe_x86\\winpe.wim c:\\winpe_x86\\ISO\\sources\\boot.wim /Y

    DISM – Step #9 – Creates bootable .ISO of WinPE 3.0

    oscdimg -n -bc:\\winpe_x86\\etfsboot.com c:\\winpe_x86\\ISO c:\\winpe_x86\\winpe_x86.iso

    Now, if you are wanting to use a flash stick you will need to format a flash stick in a certain way, and then simply copy the contents of the c:\winpe_x86\ISO\ to your flash drive. And thats it! Stick it in a computer, restart, and boot to it. The .ISO made in step #9 can simply be burned to a CD with Nero or other program capable of making bootable CD and then you can boot to it in the same way.

    DISM – Step #10 – Optional Backup

    xcopy /e /y "C:\\winpe_x86" E:\\BACKUP_FOLDER_FOR_LATEST_BOOT_BUILD\\ 

    This step is optional, but I always like to keep a backup for the future. Also, if you ever need to create another bootable flash stick or CD you can simply go to your backup and grab the files.

    windows-xp-sp3

    Windows XP SP3 Sysprep – Copy User Profile

    The line below needs to be added to the unattended section in the sysprep.inf file. The Unattended section should look like the following below.

    [Unattended]
         InstallFilesPath=C:\sysprep\i386
         UpdateServerProfileDirectory=1
    

    This will make sure the administrator profile is copied over to the default profile for ever user.

    Buy Windows XP SP3 here!

    java

    Java 1.6.0.12 .msi package for distribution

    Last msi package I tested today was Java. They also offer the msi package on their website. First you need to download their “offline installation” executable here. Then run the executable but don’t go through any additional prompts. Navigate to LocalAppData folder (the user’s Application Data folder). The location of the LocalAppData folder differs for each Windows platform.

    * Windows Vista: C:\Users\\AppData\LocalLow\Sun\Java\jre1.6.0_12
    * Windows XP: C:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data
    * Windows 2000 C:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data

    Copy the contents out of that folder to where you are keeping your msi distribution packages. The folder should look like the picture below without the install.bat which is my batch file.

    Java Directory Contents

    Java Directory Contents

    Here is the command I used for a quiet install for multiple users:

    msiexec /i "jre1.6.0_12.msi" SETMULTIUSER=1 /qb"

    Works fine for multiple users under windows 2000, XP, and Vista. More MSI package instructions coming tomorrow along with some tutorials on ImageX/Sysprep for Vista.